Our words for this week are Independence or Initiative.

This picture shows the Sensitive Period for the use of hands in Montessori School. Children enjoy sorting, and classifying objects in the classroom. I would say this picture is definitely showing sorting different textures or sorting fruits and vegetables in a science lesson. Rosemarie Spina http//mymontessorijourney.typepad.comMisbehaving-Child.jpg

Montessori's view on misbehaving is that a child is not engaged in what he or she is doing. The student is supposed to be an independent learner who learns through observation. What if the student refuses to tkae the initiative to do work because they simply do not want to perform the task? I guess this child is NOT a Montessori student! --Jess McAllister

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Montessori's third exercise for reading and writing championed the use of a, "moveable alphabet" that allowed children to look at a picture of an object, attempt to sound it out then try to spell it with the letters porvided. Brian Tait

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http://www.thepediatrictherapyclinic.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/webassets/children-playing.jpg


Montessori learning is a hands on process, whereby children gain confidence and work independently to learn tasks. They include, the basic need for order, development of motor skills, and language acquisition. This picture was obtained from google by googling images of children at play.~Debbie Olivieri




Independence

The goal of Montessori Schools is to create an enviroment in school that is equal to that of home. The children have time to become independent They create an enviroment that the children can master independence. This picture inaccordance with the educational goal shows the children are working alone and appear to be happy and at peace . They are completely engrossed in what they are doing, an inner peace is evident.
picture from google - independence and initiative theory images.




Burhedita


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Vincent Joseph Cacia III
The image below presents a young student learning how to count independently. His method of learning is clearly rooted in Montessori, for the child is using what seems to be beads attached to blocks to build skyscraper models. If you notice under each model is a number that denotes the number of bead used to build the skyscraper model.

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Home_Image-1.jpg This picture illustrates four different children working and learning independently at their own pace through their own imagination. Montessori philosophy aims to help the development of children within the context of their own personal situation.
This picture was taken from www.montessorischoolofclarkston.com. ~Amy Howlett

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Maria Montessori would be appalled to see this. She believed that penning children in when they have learned to walk will deminish their independence later on in life. http://bit.ly/8Dk1fc -Ann Marissa
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This is the result of Montessori's first sensitive period. As you can see, this child became exhausted from putting her toys in their place. Montessori says during this period, children have a need for putting things in order. http://bit.ly/8VHwSg--ann marissa

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This playful excercise with sparklers strikes me as a significant display of independence. The child is beyond any sense of fear regarding the sparklers and has a feeling of control over a potentionally dangerous situation. With proper adult supervision the child can learn from this experience and keep "fun with sparklers" in a distinct category from other activities that create sparks or flames. Given Montessori's de-emphasis of playing, I am not sure she would see the value in this excercise that I do. Mark Monaghan




This picture I selected because it had to do with a child buiding blocks which is what my paper was about. This child is not easily frustrated and finds it easy to build this big tower at his young age. Lindsay Chitwood

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This picture shows a student working independently and demonstrating concentration. Montessori would suggest that teachers don't intervene during this process and allow the child to come out of her concentration on her own.
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By Robin Bigsby


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Montessori believed that children learning useful cooking skills at a young age at their own pace could help them gain a sense of independence as they grow up.